Species – The Top Spiders

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Even though spiders, in general, have earned a pretty bad reputation for themselves, no thanks to their fierce and daring look, our leaper friends (family salticidae) are cute and intelligent creatures with so much going for them.

In addition to looking fascinating, jumping spiders are pretty interesting creatures. From their hunting skills to their physical attributes, it’s easy to see why our furry friends get all the attention. Although jumping spiders are venomous, their venom is only potent enough to harm their prey. So as humans, you have nothing to worry about a jumping spider’s venom. And in case you ever get bitten by one, you’ll only experience slight irritations, redness, and mild pain that disappears after a couple of days.

Having given you some background about our leaper friends, it’s time to address the elephant in the room by giving you a brief description of different species of jumping spiders and what is unique about them.

Abracadabrella jumping spider

Call it the most brilliant jumping spider out there, and you’ll not be wrong. From impeccable vision to impressive jumping skills to mesmerizing spider display, we have no doubt you’ll find this jumping spider species charming and intriguing.

Like most jumping spiders, the Abracadabrella is a genus of spiders and is an integral member of the family salticidae. Unlike other jumping spiders species we have come across, this one tends to mimic flies because it shares specific characteristics with flies. As per feeding, the Abracadabrella jumping spider mostly prefers flies, even though it won’t shy away from other smaller insects like mosquitoes, crickets, aphids, ants, and more.

Black Headed Jumping Spider

While this jumping spider is commonly known as the black-headed jumping spider, it is scientifically referred to as Trite planiceps. And for those who know nothing about this jumping spider, you’ll be happy to learn that it is the most common jumping spider endemic to New Zealand. Adult males and females of this jumping spider species measure between 6 to 13.5mm

While most species of jumping spiders rely on their impeccable eyesight to stalk their prey, the black-headed jumping spider is believed to seize prey even in the dark, and that’s thanks to its sophisticated vibratory signals. And unlike traditional spiders, T. planiceps do not use webs for hunting; instead, this jumping spider uses its impeccable jumping skills for hunting and evading predators.

Mopsus Mormon jumping spider

Mopsus Mormon is a unique jumping spider species that is endemic to Australia. Like many jumping spiders out there, this one belongs to the family Salticidae. While their scientific name, Mopsus Mormon, has trailed them for many years, this jumping spider species is commonly referred to as the green jumping spider, given its predominantly green body.

Outside Australia, the green jumping spider has been spotted as far as New Guinea. Measuring only 12 mm in length, the green jumping spider is arguably Australia’s most enormous jumping spider.

Adult males of this jumping spider species are easy to identify, and that’s all thanks to their striking colors and decorated long white side-whiskers. Even though females lack the whiskers and topknot, they feature a red and white mask that makes them easy to identify.

Bavia Jumping Spider Species

Although the Bavia jumping spider may not be among the most popular jumping spiders out there, guess what? Our leaper friends have some striking features that single them out from other jumping spider species.

To start with, this jumping spider has a brown cephalothorax along with some white hairs and patches. Additionally, their slender legs look predominantly yellowish-brown with dark brown femora. And far as their distribution is concerned, Bavia jumping spiders have been mostly sighted in Malaysia, Australia, and several other Pacific islands.

Peacock Jumping Spider

The peacock jumping spider is one of the most elegant jumping spiders you’ll ever come across. Besides being fuzzy, our leaper friend is flashy and displays great dancing moves, a unique feature that comes alive when it needs to mate.

Away from their elegant looks and unique dancing skills, the peacock jumping spider is a great hunter with impeccable jumping skills and powerful vision, strong enough to detect prey from some distance away. Although the peacock jumping spider will mainly feed on insects, it will also feast on other spiders, especially on starving days.

Plexippus Jumping Spider

Plexippus is an intelligent species of jumping spider that is native to southeast Asia. While this jumping spider has spread to other parts of the world, its population is growing in the United States, where they are commonly referred to as pantropical jumping spiders.

They are primarily associated with buildings and may be spotted near light sources, stalking small insects attracted to lights. While adult females of this jumping spider measure approximately 9 to 12 mm, their male counterparts are slightly smaller as they measure between 11 to 12 mm. Like many jumping spiders out there, our leaper friends do not spin webs; instead, they build a silken retreat in an elevated position, from where they make hunting forays.

Philaeus Chrysops Jumping Spider

Philaeus Chrysops is a species of jumping spider that belongs to the family Salticidae.

Though they have a widespread distribution, our leaper friends occur primarily in the Palearctic, specifically from Portugal, all the way to China and South Korea. Yes, they may not be the biggest jumping spiders out there, but with a body length of 7 to 12 mm, you’ll agree that the Philaeus Chrysops isn’t a tiny spider either.

Even though most female jumping spiders are bigger than their male counterparts, for the Philaeus Chrysops, things are somewhat different as the males are often bigger than their female counterparts.

Habronattus Jumping Spider

There are jumping spiders, and there is the Habronattus jumping spider, an intelligent jumping spider with many striking physical attributes. For starters, this jumping spider is an integral member of the family Salticidae. Not just that, it is also a genus of ground-dwelling jumping spiders, which are sometimes called paradise jumpers.

Interestingly, this jumping spider got their common name for the sheer fact that females of this jumping spider look rather plain-looking compared to their male counterparts, who have been described as very showy, much like the Birds of Paradise.

Myrmarachne Jumping Spider

The Myrmarachne jumping spider is an exceptional genus of ant-mimicking jumping spiders. This unique species of jumping spider was first described by W.S. MacLeay in 1839. Even though our fuzzy friends are commonly called ant-mimicking spiders, they aren’t the only species of jumping spiders with this attribute.

One striking thing about the Myrmarachne jumping spider is that their color can vary from black to yellow, depending on the ants’ species they are mimicking. Interestingly, this can change throughout their life. For instance, one African Myrmarachne was observed to mimic certain ants species when it was a juvenile and another ant species as an adult.

Telamonia Dimidiata Jumping spider

Popularly called the two-striped jumping spider, thanks to its unique physical attributes, the Telamonia dimidiata is a unique jumping spider species that has a solid base in various Asian tropical rainforests and foliages in wooded environments.

While adult females of this jumping spider species have a body length of 9 to 11 mm, males are slightly smaller and measure between 8 to 9 mm. Unfortunately, this jumping spider has been the subject of several email hoaxes. In 1999, for instance, several email claims were suggesting that this spider was fatal and found lurking under a toilet seat in North Florida.

There were also similar rumors circulated in 1999, only that it came under South America Blusher Spider’s name. Until this moment, there hasn’t been any evidence to suggest that the Telamonia Dimidiata jumping spider is fatal or dangerous to humans.

Emerald Jumping Spider

Emerald jumping spiders are flashy species of spiders who like to flaunt their attractive colors. Their iridescent scales make them especially shiny. Also known as golden jumping spiders, our leaper friends are less than half-inch long and are very popular across the United States and Central America.

In general, this jumping spider species is small and hairy and has an impressive vision that most jumping spiders can boast of. Their four big eyes and the four smaller eyes on the top of their heads give them a 360-degree view. Thanks to their impeccable hunting and jumping skills, Emerald jumping spiders tend to patiently stalk their prey like cats and pounce on them when they come within jumping distance.

Hispo Jumping Spider

The Hispo jumping spider is unique in every way. From its physical features to its size and what it likes to feed on, our furry friend has carved a place for itself in the spider world. To start with, the Hispo jumping spider is capable of thriving very well in any environment it is introduced to.

And before we get ahead of ourselves, keep in mind that this jumping spider species belong to the family Salticidae. Though they aren’t among the most enormous jumping spiders, with an average size of 5 to 8 mm, they aren’t the smallest either. As per their feeding, our spider friends will feast on small and large insects like flies, mosquitoes, ants, aphids, and other tiny web-building spiders.

Aelurillus Jumping Spider

Like other jumping spiders we have come across, the Aelurillus is a genus of spiders that belongs to the family Salticidae. Even though this jumping spider species don’t have so much going on in terms of their size, adult females typically measure about 7 mm while their male counterparts come in slightly smaller at 5 mm. While they are generally stout, furry, and rather squat-shaped, you’ll sometimes spot females that are uniformly mottled sandy brown. On the flip side, adult males are mostly black and sometimes feature a unique pattern across their bodies.

Sibianor Aurocintus Jumping spider

The Sibianor aurocintus is a unique jumping spider species. Like most jumping spiders, Sibianor aurocintus is an integral member of the family Salticidae. Though they are generally small, their predominant black color makes them super easy to identify.

While there isn’t much information regarding males of this jumping spider species, it is believed that adult males have swollen forelegs. Interestingly, this species’ adult females have orange-colored bodies predominantly, making them conspicuous and easy to identify.

Hentzia Jumping Spider

Crowned Hentzia jumping spiders are a small and harmless jumping spider species that belongs to the family Salticidae. Despite their small size, our spider friends are efficient predators of insects. During hunting, our leaper friends tend to wander deep into human territories in search of prey. Like other jumping spider species, the Hentzia jumping spider can jump many times father than its body length. Thanks to this unique attribute, it can effectively capture prey or evade predators.

In terms of physical description, Henzia jumping spider features coppery red hairs on their head, which resembles a crown.

Icius jumping spider

Icius jumping spider is a notable species of jumping spider that belongs to the family Salticidae. In terms of distribution, this jumping spider species has been mostly sighted in Spain, Portugal, Romania, France, Italy, Greece, and Poland.

The adult of this jumping spider species can reach approximately 5 to 7 mm in length. And just so you know, our leaper friends prefer dry and hot habitats; this explains why they are mostly sighted around sunny bushes, walls of houses, shrubs where they are seen to hunt their prey actively. Adult males of this jumping spider species have a predominantly hairy and rusty brown body. Also, you’ll notice a white longitudinal stripe on the edge of their opisthosoma. In terms of feeding, our leaper friends will feast on small and large insects.

Synageles Venator Jumping Spider

The Synageles Venator is an intelligent species of ant-like jumping spider. While this spider belongs to the family Salticidae, it mainly occurs in the Palearctic region, North Africa and Canada. In Central Europe, our furry friends have been described as the most common ant-like jumping spiders.

While adult females of this jumping spider measure about 4 mm in length, males are slightly smaller. Although they are a little smaller compared to the jumping spider Leptorchestes berolinensis, they feature a conspicuous white line on the back of their heads.

If you look very closely at our spider friends, they are virtually indistinguishable from ants, and that’s because they move rapidly like ants and tend to raise their second pair of legs, so it looks like an ant’s antenna.

Corythalia jumping spider

The Corythalia jumping spider isn’t a very popular species of jumping spiders, so it’s easy to see why there isn’t much information about our spider friends. Even though Carl Ludwig first described them in 1850, research suggests that over 69 species of this jumping spider are found in the Caribean, United States, South America, and Mexico.

In terms of size, the Corythalia jumping spider is a medium-sized jumping spider that measures between 4 to 7 mm in length. And just like other jumping spiders out there, our fuzzy friends will feast on small and large insects like aphids, flies, ants, crickets, and other tiny spiders.

Salticinae Jumping Spider

Even though there are many unique jumping spiders out there, the Salticinae jumping spider has earned its place among the unique jumping spiders we have encountered. From exciting spider display and sheer brilliance, this spider has warmed its way into the heart of exotic pet lovers.

While this subfamily of jumping spiders is closely related to Salticidae, we are happy to inform you that the Salticinae is divided into two unranked clades: Amycoida and Salticoida. Like other jumping spiders, this jumping spider is a medium-sized jumping spider with an average body length of 7 to 10 mm.

Zygoballus Jumping Spider

The Zygoballus jumping spider is a remarkable species of jumping spiders that belong to the family Salticidae. In terms of their distribution, this jumping spider species are mostly sighted in the Southern parts of the United States, where they have been mostly spotted in a variety of grassy habitats. Adult members of this jumping spider species aren’t very big, so it’s no surprise to see them measure between 3 and 4.5 mm in length.

Both males and females of this jumping spider species have abdomen and cephalothorax that look essentially bronze or black. Additionally, their legs feature reddish-brown to yellow markings. Although adult males have very prominent chelicerae along with front femora, they typically show ritualized courtship behavior when they want to mate.

Menemerus Jumping Spider

Eugene Louis Simon first described this jumping spider species in 1868. As a brilliant genus of jumping spiders, the Menemrus jumping spiders look very hairy and have a medium-sized body that measures between 4 to 10 mm.

Unlike other jumping spiders we have come across, this one has a flattened body, along with a very hairy body made up of predominantly greyish hairs. Most of the jumping spiders that make up this genus have very conspicuous white edges on their thorax. Also, they have an oval abdomen, which looks elongated or round most of the time.

Heliophanus Jumping Spider

Heliophanus jumping spiders are among the most popular genera of jumping spiders we have encountered. And because they belong to the family Salticidae, it doesn’t come as a surprise that this jumping spider displays most of the common characteristics of jumping spiders.

As of right now, over 170 described species of this jumping spider are believed to occur in Africa. That said, some species are also scattered around the Palearctic region, mainly from Europe to Japan. In terms of physical description, adult females measure between 4.6 to 5.8 while their male counterparts can reach a body length of 3.6 to 4 mm.

Lyssomanes Jumping Spider

The lyssomanes jumping spider is an intriguing spider genus of the family Salticidae, which ranges from Central and Southern America up to the southern United States. According to experts, there are over 94 described extant and two fossil species from the Neotropical region.

The general Chinoscopus, Lysommanes, Sumakuru, and Hindumanes, make up the Lyssomaninae, which experts believe is one of the six deeply diverging subfamilies in the jumping spiders world. One unique thing about our spider friends is that they have predominantly long legs and translucent bodies, which appear either green or yellowish. Because of their large anterior median eyes, they are sometimes mistaken for lynx spiders.

Colonus Puerperus Jumping Spider

This jumping spider species has a widespread distribution, especially in the eastern parts of the United States. Today, their range stretches from the Gulf Coast of Florida to Texas. They also have a budding population in Illinois, Kansas, and Pennsylvania.

Studies have shown that our leaper friends prefer grassy areas, especially during the year’s warmer months. While they may not be the biggest jumping spiders out there, adult females are medium-sized and measure between 7 and 11 mm. On the flip side, males measure between 5 and 7 mm.

Spartaeinae Jumping Spider

Talk about intelligent species of jumping spiders, and you’ll not be wrong to mention the Spartaeinae jumping spiders. Like many jumping spiders out there, this one belongs to the subfamily of the spider family Salticidae. This subfamily of jumping spiders includes popular groups like the Boetheae, Cocaleae, Codeteae, and Cyrbeae.

The unique thing about our leaper friends is that they are Paleaotropical and have an extensive diversity across Malaysia and the Indonesian archipelagos. As unusual salticids, Spartaeinae jumping spiders are considered basal to the phylogenetic tree of the jumping spider clan. Because they share many similarities to the Lyssomaninae, it’s no surprise to see that they lack many of the derived features that most Salticinae possesses.

Euophryini Jumping Spider

Euophryini jumping spiders are easy to identify, thanks to bright colors along with their distinct courtship display. While these jumping spider species belong to the family Salticidae, they are also members of the subfamily Euophryinae. Their bright and attractive colors make them a joy to behold. And just so you know, their antics, hunting, and jumping skills are as advanced as those of other jumping spider species. And because of their ability to thrive very well in any environment, they are introduced to, you’ll find our spider friends in both temperate and tropical regions.

Pellenes Jumping Spider

The Pellenes is a distinct genus of jumping spiders first described by Eugene Louis in 1876. Thanks to the myriad of studies conducted to understand our spider friend, it is considered a high-ranking member of the Hyllothyene. This jumping spider species appear dark to black and feature some white stripes on the back. They also have some very distinct red markings. Most species that make up this genus have a knack for snail shells. Plus, adult males look a lot like Hasarius adansoni, especially when viewed from the front.

Pseudeuophrys Jumping Spider

Pseudeuophrys jumping spider is a genus of jumping spider that belongs to the family Salticidae. They are spread throughout Europe and have some distinct physical features you just can’t ignore.

While adult males reach a body length of 3 mm, their female counterparts measure approximately 5 mm. Members of this jumping spider genus are mostly found inside buildings, with adults spotted even in deep winter. As per feeding, they prefer to feast on booklice.

Toxeus Magnus Jumping Spider

Our spider friends are a species of jumping spiders that makes up the genus Toxeus. Interestingly, they are endemic to Southeast Asia and Taiwan.

Though they were initially classified as part of the genus Myrmarachne in 1933, they were later reclassified as Toxeus in 2016 by Jerzy Proszynski. This species is recognized for being a non-mammalian animal with the ability to nurse young ones through a form of lactation. They are also renowned for their exceptional social behavior.

Carrhotus Xanthogramma Jumping Spider

Carrhotus Xanthogramma is an intelligent species of jumping spiders. Like other jumping spiders, it belongs to the family Salticidae. Thanks to their Palearctic distribution, you’ll commonly find them in Europe, Asia, some parts of Africa, and Southern America. Because they are thermophilic, it’s no surprise to learn that they prefer sunny and warm environments.

Cosmophasis Jumping Spider

This jumping spider species is most commonly sighted in Southeast Asia. Thanks to their breathtaking physical attributes, our leaper friends are pretty famous for their brilliant and shiny ultraviolet light. While they are members of the genus, Cosmophosis, they are also members of the family Salticidae.

As per habitat, our leaper friends are commonly spotted on green vegetation. Adult males of this jumping spider are particularly famous for exhibiting extreme dimorphism, especially when viewed under UV light.

Maevia inclemens Jumping Spider

Our spider friends are one of the most common and colorful jumping spiders you’ll encounter in North America. Adult males of this jumping spider species display two forms of a very rare phenomenon in zoology, and that’s because they exhibit different courting displays.

While adult females are bigger and measure between 6.5 to 8.0 mm, males come in at about 4.75 to 6.5 mm. Like all jumping spiders, Maevia inclemens have excellent vision and are among the eight species that make up the genus Maevia.

Himalayan Jumping Spider Euophrys

The Himalayan jumping spider, or the Euophrys omnisuperstes, as they are popularly called, are a very small species of jumping spider that live at an elevation of up to 6,7000 in the Himalayas. Because of their unique environment, our spider friends have earned themselves the highest known permanent residents on Earth.

They are also commonly found among rocky debris and feeding on tiny flies and stray springtails.

Evarcha Jumping Spider

Besides being a genus of spiders, Evarcha also belongs to the family Salticidae. At the moment, there are over 85 recognized subspecies of this jumping spider distributed across the world.

In terms of habitat, the Evarcha jumping spider is most commonly spotted on shrubs and short plants in damp areas. Sometimes, you may spot it resting in silken cells. When it comes to their physical description, you’ll notice that they look rather sturdy and not very colorful like other spiders we have come across. Experts have described them as an uncommon predator because they mainly prefer to feed on vertebrate blood.

Marpissa Muscosa Jumping Spider

Being part of Saliticidae, the Marpissa jumping spider shares some unique characteristics with other jumping spider species. Though they aren’t the biggest jumping spider we have encountered, their average body length of 7.5 to 14 mm means they aren’t the smallest jumping spiders either.

As per physical appearance, both sexes are predominantly colored grey to brown. Also, they have a furry appearance followed by a flattened body shape. Like other jumping spider species, Marpissa spiders display extreme social hierarchy, as weeker members acknowledge their inferiority by strutting their front legs somewhat slowly while bidding a retreat from the scene.

Gray Wall Jumper – Menmerus

Gray wall jumping spiders, or Menemerus bivittatus as they are scientifically called, are integral members of Salticidae. As pantropical species, our leaper friends are commonly found on walls of buildings or tree trunks where they like to stalk their prey. In general, Gray wall jumping spiders are dorso-ventrally flattened. Not just that, they are also covered in short, dense, and greyish-white hairs.

While females measure 9 mm, their male counterparts are slightly smaller. Even though the Gray wall jumper is native to Africa, it has a widespread distribution. This explains their cosmopolitan distribution.

Naphrys Pulex Jumping Spider

This jumping spider species belong to the family Salticidae and has a wide distribution in the United States and Canada. Adult males of this jumping spider spot gray and black molting just on the top of their cephalothorax, legs, and abdomen. They also have an orange coloration around the sides of their cephalothorax.

In terms of their natural habitat, Naphrys pulex prefers tallgrass prairies and wooded areas, which explains why you’ll mostly spot them in mesic hardwood forest where there is an abundance of leaf litter.

Hyllus Giganteus Jumping Spider

Commonly called the giant jumping spider, Hyllus giganteus is a famous jumping spider found in Australia and Sumatra. This jumping spider has earned its place as the largest jumping spider species ever known to science. With a body length of 1.8 to 2.5 centimeters, only very few jumping spiders can come close.

Thanks to their friendly and kind demeanor, Hyllus giganteus are pretty popular among hobbyists and breeders.

White Mustached Jumping Spider

White mustached jumping spiders, or Portia labiata, like they are scientifically called, are jumping spiders, commonly found in India, Sri Lanka, southern China, Malaysia, and a host of Asian countries.

Despite being medium-sized, our leaper friends are daring and will take on prey twice their size. They have a predominantly orange-brown front and a mostly brownish back. Thanks to their impressive eyesight, this spider has a more complex vision than that of cats. Because their hunting skills are as versatile and adaptable as lions, it’s easy to see why they are sometimes called eight-legged cats.

Bold Jumping Spiders

Phidippus audax is a species of jumping spider that is commonly sighted in North America. While their scientific name, Phidippus audax has trailed them for many years, they are more commonly referred to as bold jumping spiders or daring jumping spiders. Though members of the Family Salticidae, Bold jumping spiders belong to the genus Phidippus, an exceptional group of jumping spiders easily identified by their large size and iridescent chelicerae. Due to their large size and forward-facing eyes, our leaper friends have good stereoscopic vision.

Magnolia Green Jumper – Lyssomanes Viridis

Commonly called the Magnolia green jumper, Lyssomanes viridis are a jumping spider species with a large population in the United States, particularly in the Southeastern parts of the United States and Florida.

Outside the United States, there have also been reported sightings of our leaper friends in Mexico, Delaware, and Guatemala. While adult females measure approximately 7 to 8 mm, males are slightly smaller and measure between 5 to 6 mm. In terms of appearance, most specimens look pale and partially translucent.

Fringed Jumping Spider

Though scientifically referred to as Portia fimbriata, our furry friends are commonly called the fringed jumping spider. Like other spiders we have encountered, Portia fimbriata belongs to Salticidae and is commonly found in Southeast Asia and Australia.

While females of this jumping spider species have bodies that are 6.8 to 1.5 mm long, their male counterparts are 5.2 to 6.5 mm long. Both males and females of these spider species have dark brown carapace and reddish-brown chelicerae.

Redback Jumping Spider

Phidippus johnsoni, or red-backed jumping spiders, are among the largest jumping spiders to occur in western North America. For the avoidance of doubt, this jumping spider is not to be confused with the highly venomous redback spider. In terms of physical description, our spider friends are about a centimeter in length. Plus, both sexes have a bright red abdomen. Among the females of this jumping spider species, you’ll notice a unique black central stripe.

Heavy Jumping Spider Hyllus Diardi

Hyllus diardi belongs to the genus Hyllus. More so, they are part of the Family Salticidae. Because of their enormous size, people occasionally refer to them as heavy jumping spiders. When it comes to their size, adult females measure between 0.39 to 0.59 inches while males are a little smaller. Thanks to their greyish-white body and black eyes, our furry friends are easy to identify.

Shiny Jumping Spider Cosmophasis Umbratica

This jumping spider species is mostly found in South and Southeast Asia. Besides their shiny ultraviolet light bodies, these jumping spider species are famous for their brilliance. While they belong to the genus Cosmophasis, they are also part of the family Salticidae. Though adult males display extreme dimorphism when viewed under UV light, females and juveniles do not reflect UV at all.

Elegant Golden Jumping Spider – Chrysilla Lauta

Our spider friends belong to the genus Chrysilla and occur mainly in the rainforest, particularly from Burma to China to Vietnam. Though the Elegant Golden jumping spider has been known since 1887, it has only been described from male specimens. Adult males are very slender and have an orange carapace. Additionally, they also have a narrow bluish-white and iridescent transverse stripe between their eyes.

Tan Jumping Spider Platycryptus Undatus

Platycryptus undatus is a species of jumping spider that belong to the family Salticidae. Besides their scientific name, our spider friends are commonly referred to as tan jumping spiders. As per their distribution, our leaper friends mainly occur in North and Central America. While females measure between 10 and 10 mm, males are slightly smaller and measure between 8.5 to 9.5 mm.

Regal Jumping Spider Phidippus Regius Species

Phidippus regius, commonly called the regal jumping spider, is a unique jumping spider species with a considerable presence in eastern North America. Though they aren’t the largest jumping spiders, with an average size of 6 to 18 mm, they can go head to head with some of the biggest species of jumping spiders out there.

One unique thing about our leaper friends is that both males and females are easily differentiated. On the one hand, adult males are always black and feature white spots and stripes. On the other hand, females have similar patterns, only that they have shades of grey to vivid orange.

Zebra Jumping Spider Salticus Scenicus

The Zebra spider or Salticus scenicus is a common species of jumping spider with a large population in the Northern Hemisphere. While their common name comes from their vivid black coloration, their scientific name comes from Salticus, a Latin word for dance and a reference to our leaper friend’s agility. Adult females of this jumping spider species are 5 to 9 mm long, while their male counterparts are 5 to 6 mm.

Dendryphantina Jumping spider

Dendryphantina jumping spiders are a subtribe of jumping spiders that mainly occur in the New World. Though this subtribe was first described in 1879 by Anton Menge as Dendryphantidae, they have gone through a series of descriptions to get to where they are today.

While females of this jumping spider species have paired spots on their abdomen, males have more pronounced chelicerae. Additionally, females of this subtribe have S-shaped epigynal openings.

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